Dermatological steroid creams

Skin graft or skin flap. Skin grafts or skin flaps are done after the scar tissue is removed. Skin grafts involve replacing or attaching skin to a part of the body that is missing skin. Skin grafts are performed by taking a piece of healthy skin from another area of the body (called the donor site) and attaching it to the needed area. Skin flaps are similar to skin grafts, where a part of the skin is taken from another area, but with the skin flaps, the skin that is retrieved has its own blood supply. The section of skin used includes the underlying blood vessels, fat, and muscles. Flaps may be used when the area that is missing the skin does not have a good supply of blood because of the location or because of damage to the vessels.

The most common side effect of topical corticosteroid use is skin atrophy. All topical steroids can induce atrophy, but higher potency steroids, occlusion, thinner skin, and older patient age increase the risk. The face, the backs of the hands, and intertriginous areas are particularly susceptible. Resolution often occurs after discontinuing use of these agents, but it may take months. Concurrent use of topical tretinoin (Retin-A) % may reduce the incidence of atrophy from chronic steroid applications. 30 Other side effects from topical steroids include permanent dermal atrophy, telangiectasia, and striae.

Many hormones and their structural and functional analogs are used as medication . The most commonly prescribed hormones are estrogens and progestogens (as methods of hormonal contraception and as HRT ), [12] thyroxine (as levothyroxine , for hypothyroidism ) and steroids (for autoimmune diseases and several respiratory disorders ). Insulin is used by many diabetics . Local preparations for use in otolaryngology often contain pharmacologic equivalents of adrenaline , while steroid and vitamin D creams are used extensively in dermatological practice.

There is no cure at present for alopecia; treatment is currently aimed at helping hair regrowth, but it cannot stop the spread of hair loss. The first line of treatment for adults and teenagers is injection of corticosteroids into the bald spots, with the goal of suppressing the immune reaction causing hair loss. This is not used for children due to the pain involved. Regrowth can be seen in 4 to 8 weeks, and treatment is repeated every 4 to 6 weeks up to a maximum of 6 months. The application of steroid creams are ineffective. There has been some success with hair regrowth with topical applications of minoxidil and anthralin. There are newer agents being tried in clinical studies such as diphenylcyclopropenone and dinitrochlorobenzene, but are not yet commercially available.

Dermatological steroid creams

dermatological steroid creams

There is no cure at present for alopecia; treatment is currently aimed at helping hair regrowth, but it cannot stop the spread of hair loss. The first line of treatment for adults and teenagers is injection of corticosteroids into the bald spots, with the goal of suppressing the immune reaction causing hair loss. This is not used for children due to the pain involved. Regrowth can be seen in 4 to 8 weeks, and treatment is repeated every 4 to 6 weeks up to a maximum of 6 months. The application of steroid creams are ineffective. There has been some success with hair regrowth with topical applications of minoxidil and anthralin. There are newer agents being tried in clinical studies such as diphenylcyclopropenone and dinitrochlorobenzene, but are not yet commercially available.

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